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Lakhamandal

  • Girish Tiwari
  • 18-Apr-2018
blog post

Lakhamandal

Lakhamandal is a place where the Pandavas lived during their exile. The Jatugriha where the jealous son of blind King Dritharashtra conspired to burn the Pandavas alive in a palace made up of shellac, known as Lakshagriha or House of Shellac, is believed to be located here. The five brothers along with their consorts escaped unscathed with the help of Lord Krishna. They were also saved by the power of Lord Shiva and Goddess Parvati, and so a Shakti temple was constructed here later. This is an important pilgrimage place and is revered by the Shakti cults who visit this place in search of peace and eternal bliss. An 18th century historic cave bearing the carving of a hundred stone figures and two Shivlingas is of immense archaeological importance.

Lakhamandal falls in the Jaunsaar-
Bhabur tribal area, where the customs and traditions as observed during the time of the Pandavas are still observed. The ancient Lakhamandal Temple is situated on a hill slope on the banks of the river Yamuna and has rich remains of ancient temples, sculptures and inscriptions, some dating from as early as the 5th century AD. The temple exhibits the North Indian temple architectural style and is encircled by lofty Himalayan peaks. lt was built in the 8th century and was constructed with numerous stone engraved figures with a mythological association. The Shiva temple that comprises a ‘triratha sanctum’ is the only temple that has survived in good condition across the ages. The temple has a five-storeyed ‘rekha-sikhara’ that leads to a modern hall and porch and a large flagged court. The sanctum enshrines a Shivlinga and the doorway to the three sakhas is carved with frolicsome ganas topped by matrikas and bevelled scrolls.